My Writing

My Writing

I get my best ideas from listening to people. Fortunately, that’s my job.

I like to say that people are my library, and my daily writing practice is a way to discover what’s in it: new ideas, inspiration, wisdom, and a little whimsy for good measure.  As your humble librarian I invite you to check out a new idea every day. No late fees ever.

Enjoy…

Never in the history of calming down…

Never in the history of calming down

I adore Calvin and Hobbes and love that Bill Watterson based on them on two famous philosophers !

I was reminded of this famous Calvin and Hobbes cartoon recently by Francis Briers, who facilitated an amazing leadership experience called “Samurai Games”.

Francis speaks and teaches of somatic presence and spoke of this during the two days our group was with him. Thank you Francis for your teaching and your modelling of what you taught. I learned a lot.

Now, back to the Calvin and Hobbes quote, which is a reminder that we exist in our bodies as well as our minds.

When we have got upset, our body has responded to various triggers that have built up and, at that stage, rational language and thinking is not the way to change your emotional state.

What might work ?

As a father, it never worked to tell my boys when they were younger and upset to “calm down”. Often I’d send them to their room for a time out before going up to talk to them. In doing that, often I needed that  “time out” as much as the child !

In that time, simply taking time out of the conversation helps. Perhaps added to that some deep breathing, or even changing focus to looking out of the window and focussing on the view.

Whatever you do, be conscious of your “state” and that it is embodied in you. Thinking your way out of  a feeling is likely not the way to go !

 

 

Doing from Being

Before I started to really look into the Japanese concept of Ikigai, I had already discovered this image as a Linked In meme :

ikigai venn diagramme

I love this visual representation, and at the same time I recognise how many of us focus on the “what you can be paid for” part first and foremost.

What if, instead, we focussed on our “Being” and then choosing to “Do” what is fully aligned with who we are, so “Doing from Being”

In his book Walden, Henry Thoreau had many great quotes, such as :

“All men want, not something to do with, but something to do, or rather something to be.” 

and :

“The mass of men lead lives of quiet desperation.” 

which is often misquoted / adjusted to say :

“Most men lead lives of quiet desperation and die with their song still inside them”

Having moved in mid 2017 to a new city and new country for me, I am meeting new people and they ask me “what do you do ?”.

I’m also asking that question of myself, and focussed on having the patience to say “who am I ?” and ask the other three questions from the Ikigai venn diagramme first, starting with the key one :

“What do you love ?”

Going one level up from that is :

“Who am I ?”

Deep questions, and I am being patient as I look to answer the question :

“What will you do with this one wild and precious life ?”

On this journey, we can choose to focus on being present to the moments and to sensing “who am I being ?” in everything we do.

From this the self-awareness and self-knowledge grows, and from that one can make choices of what to “do”.

So, perhaps over time when people ask me “what do you do?” the answer may change.

 

Make Music

It is said that it takes 30 days to make a habit, to engrain something and build neural pathways.

From an earlier post, I am committing myself to leading a “Wild and Precious” life, and one of Presence.

As part of my creative process I’m writing again.

To this, I have the self-knowledge that I tend to focus on being busy and not on making the time to “Do the Work” (as Steven Pressfield would say!).  I’m also aware of a tendency to seek approval and attention rather than simply taking pleasure and meaning in the activity itself.

I anchor, then, on this passage from “The Little Book of Ikigai” by Ken Mogi :

Make music, even when nobody is listening. Draw a picture when nobody is watching. Write a short story that no one will read. The inner joys and satisfaction will be more than enough to make you carry on with your life. If you have succeeded in doing so, then you have made yourself a master of being in the here and now.

PS : As I write this, today’s email came in from Seth Godin, who has posted a daily blog every day (EVERY day) for well over 20 years. So, I googled “Seth Godin daily” and found this post from him called “Daily” :

There’s a fundamental difference between the things you do every day, every single day, and the things you do only when the spirit moves you.

One difference is that once you’ve committed to doing something daily, you find that the spirit moves you, daily.

Seth once spoke of one motivation for him being to “open doors for those that open doors for others”. I hope to do the same and am inspired by you. Thank you, Seth !

Ikigai, Pleasure and Meaning

I’ve been drawn to the concept of Ikigai for some time. In September 2017 Ken Mogi published “The Little Book of Ikigai” and from such a short book full of wonderful stories I have taken so much. Making it ultra concise and also visual, I honour the talent of Dani Saveker and her Visual Synopsis of the book :

Ikigai Visual Synopsis.jpg

At the base of this visual synopsis are the five pillars of Ikigai, and I will come back to these often in upcoming posts, as I see them as powerful tools for self-knowledge, one of the pillars of #OpenLeadership.

For now, I focus on the combination of “starting small”, “joy of the little things” and “be in the here and now” as represented in the two examples of simplicity and perfection below.

There are many wonderful stories in the book, starting with the choice of Sukiyabashi Jiro as the restaurant for President Obama to eat in for his welcome dinner with the Prime Minister of Japan. The owner and operator, Jiro Ono, worked for over sixty years with an unrelenting focus on one thing, making the best sushi in the world. The documentary “Jiro Dreams of Sushi” tells the story :

Now, back to London, where I often ride my bike out to Richmond Park. I love the feeling of being present to the moment that comes with cycling, particularly in nature and out of the city. In less than an hour I can ride out of the centre of the city, make a lap of the park, and then I can make a stop at a special place.

That special place is Pen Ponds Cafe, a small trailer run by an Italian family and that makes excellent coffee, and probably the best bacon roll I’ve ever tasted. Given that I am on a lifelong quest for the simple pleasure of finding the best bacon roll ever, this is high praise. If you see me sitting at a bench in my cycling gear with my black coffee and bacon roll, know that I am truly appreciating every moment and every sensation.

I give you this photo from the other day at my latest visit, and ask you to consider the parallels between Jiro and the master of the bacon rolls as he stands at his post 364 days per year, year after year….

bacon rolls

…….in this modern world that we make so complex, what does it teach us to see someone at work taking pleasure and meaning from perfection of one simple task ?

Life is Wild and Precious, Be Present

January 2017, a glorious winter’s day at the top of a mountain in the Alps with an amazing group of inspiring entrepreneurs, or “Snowhowers“, including Dr Rachel Morris, who had been so inspired by this phrase that she used this when she left the mountain as inspiration for her business, “Wild Monday“.

I love the phrase and the emphasis on simplicity and presence in and focus on each moment. Please take a few moments to read the poem, then read it again, then one more time, slowly, before reading the rest of this post.

The Summer Day

Who made the world?
Who made the swan, and the black bear?
Who made the grasshopper?
This grasshopper, I mean-
the one who has flung herself out of the grass,
the one who is eating sugar out of my hand,
who is moving her jaws back and forth instead of up and down-
who is gazing around with her enormous and complicated eyes.
Now she lifts her pale forearms and thoroughly washes her face.
Now she snaps her wings open, and floats away.
I don’t know exactly what a prayer is.
I do know how to pay attention, how to fall down
into the grass, how to kneel down in the grass,
how to be idle and blessed, how to stroll through the fields,
which is what I have been doing all day.
Tell me, what else should I have done?
Doesn’t everything die at last, and too soon?
Tell me, what is it you plan to do
with your one wild and precious life?
—Mary Oliver

So, what does this say to you? What are you reflecting on?

It is an anchor for me to both be present to every moment and also to live my purpose of #MakingPotentialPossible.

As to purpose, in June 2017 I moved to a new city (London) in effectively a new country to me, having lived overseas for over 27 years until this move. I chose to take this leap with care and consideration and at the same time with instinct and intention, to look to more fully realise my potential to serve this world.

Now, as I write this I am several months into this adventure and already find there is a voice in me that looks to play safe, and also looks to keep busy, as I know how to have a comfortable life through being busy and playing safe.

However, what is it I plan to do with my one wild and precious life? I have no plan, yet I have an intention to hold every moment as Wild and Precious so I will say no to the safe, I will not fill my diary indiscriminately.

As to Presence, I recently read “The Little Book of Ikigai” by Ken Mogi. Ikigai is from “Iki” (to live) and “gai” (reason). It is also about finding pleasure as well as meaning through such pillars of Ikigai as starting small and being in the here and now.

When people ask you how you are in a business context, have you ever replied: “busy”, to which they respond with pleased nods and “good”. Busyness has become something we all strive for, yet with this, we have so often lost our sense of presence.

Did you perhaps reflect on that when you read Mary Oliver’s poem three times? Or, instead, did you only read it once, despite my request to read it three times, or even skip reading it?

In the book, Mogi reflects on the Japanese concept of Ichigo Ichie, or “one time, one encounter”, which originated with the Japanese tea ceremony.

Ichigo Ichie is the “appreciation of the ephemeral character of any encounters with people, things or events in life”, or, as my friend Morgan DaCosta puts it “no ordinary moments !”.

Mogi says: “Precisely because an encounter is ephemeral, it must be taken seriously”.

So, in our lives, how often over the years have we chosen to not be present to each moment, to laying in the grass and closely studying the grasshopper, rather than checking our phone or letting our mind wander to somewhere other than the here and now?

Tell me, what is it you plan to do with your one wild and precious life?

UNTHINKABLE – 7 : Open Leadership – What is it ?

The UNTHINKABLE articles were first posted on Linked In. 

I smile as I recognise that the speed of change and evolution now means that I’ve put developing this leadership model on hold for now. I am, however, leaving these 7 articles up as I feel they do illustrate core source issues and opportunities for leaders to look at in themselves prior to developing and practicing their own evolution of their leadership.

(The seventh in a series of articles inspired by a Sep 26, 2017 Workshop for Entrepreneurial Scotland)

 

In the opening article of this series, I began with a summary of where I am with developing the #OpenLeadership model.

The next five articles focussed on elements of “Let Go”, and now we move to Open Leadership itself.

When I wrote the opening article one month ago, two days after running a workshop that inspired me to create this series, I gave a brief summary of the three elements of Open Leadership as being :

  • VISION as a concept must change to a general sense of direction, subject to frequent course correction. A very different model for visionary leadership.
  • COLLABORATION. Open Leadership is truly collaborative
  • HUMILITY. The seven most powerful words in business “I don’t’ know, what do you think” (when delivered with confidence that the answer is within the collective).

It makes me smile at myself to recognise that my thoughts have evolved even in this month, as I have both written this series of short LI articles and also committed to write daily on tommccallum.com on a wider range of themes.

I’m already feeling that what I came up with in the drawing above is evolving, so in upcoming articles around Open Leadership and the three themes above, I can sense things will evolve further.

For now, let me muse in this first article on the theme of Open Leadership. As I stay with this theme in the next few articles, let’s see what emerges.

So, a business hero of mine, Chip Conley, is the person from whom I first heard the phrase Vulnerable Visionary. I’ve listened to Chip speak many times, so let me try to capture some of this thoughts on what it means to be such a person. The sort of person with such Open Leadership characteristics as :

  • Absolute drive, passion and commitment towards the purpose of the busiess. They are, simply put, the “Keeper of the Vision” for all who are part of it.
  • Able, when asked for the answers by their team, to say the seven powerful words “I don’t know, what do you think ?”, and with an energy that is open and almost literally lifts up the team and draws the best from them.
  • Confidence. Vision, Collaboration and Humility lose much of their value if the leader is not confident that the Vision will be reached and that the team can do it together. They may have doubts that the vision is “nailed down” and they may have doubts on strategy and execution at times. All of that is absolutely normal, natural and real. However, it is also key that the leader has bulletproof confidence that everything will work out.

**Edit, found the video of Chip on an old Tweet I posted years ago ! :

Adding to this, I recently discovered a recent article by Tom Nixon. Tom is fond of referencing a few key people he looks up to, and at the same time I truly love when he then synthesises his own thoughts, as he does with these closing words in the article :

“Keep tuning into your need. Take responsibility for the process of realising it. Listen to all of the information and wait to get clear on the next step and then take it. Allow a creative hierarchy to naturally emerge to help you. And don’t stop until you’re done.”

Tom Nixon, modelling what being a vulnerable visionary is.

UNTHINKABLE – 6 : “Let Go” – Response-Ability

The UNTHINKABLE articles were first posted on Linked In. 

I smile as I recognise that the speed of change and evolution now means that I’ve put developing this leadership model on hold for now. I am, however, leaving these 7 articles up as I feel they do illustrate core source issues and opportunities for leaders to look at in themselves prior to developing and practicing their own evolution of their leadership.

(The sixth in a series of articles inspired by a Sep 26, 2017 Workshop for Entrepreneurial Scotland)

 

 

Of all the books I read and recommend to others, top of the list is Man’s Search for Meaning. There is so much in this short volume to recommend, and at the core of it is Frankl’s philosophy that our core driver is to find meaning in life (which ties back to the Japanese concept of Ikigai, written about a number of times on my site, including here)

Today’s article focusses on the third of the elements under the them of “Let Go“. Once we have self-knowledge and then focus that on managing the energy, what level of ability do we have to be “response-able” when needed as leaders ?

As Frankl puts it :

“Between stimulus and response there is a space. In that space is our power to choose our response. In our response lies our growth and our freedom.” 

and

“The one thing you can’t take away from me is the way I choose to respond to what you do to me. The last of one’s freedoms is to choose one’s attitude in any given circumstance.” 

I’ve heard leaders argue that they are under stress, they have too much to do, that others don’t understand what it is like. The first half of Frankl’s book tells his story of surviving in a nazi concentration camp. He was able to respond.

On a perhaps more relatable level for us, yet still literally unbelievable for many, an astonishing ultra-endurance athlete called Mark Beaumont in September 2017 smashed the world record for cycling around the world, beating the mythical “Around the World in 80 days” by riding 18,049 miles in 78 days and 14 hours. Do your own calculations on this. Unthinkable indeed !

After completing the ride, Mark did a 35″ interview with Global Cycling Network and a lot of it was about the physical endurance needed for the ride. Amazing though those elements of the interview were, what really struck me was Mark’s mental approach.

Listen from 5:54 to 7:15 here , where he talks about : “once you are fully committed….your ability to complete is your ability to suffer…..”

Also from 14:13 to here, including “after you are two or three weeks in…the body has an amazing ability to adapt…if you’ve not broken down and had to stop after the first two or three weeks”. Yes, he is talking about ignoring injuries and the mental fortitude of getting through the first TWO OR THREE WEEKS with injuries etc. Unreal.

I’ve known Mark for some years and always been inspired by him. Inspirational level of self-knowledge gained through his global adventures. I can imagine Mark would only very rarely react, rather than be response-able, whatever comes his way.

How about you, looking honestly at self, are you able to respond or do you react ? If you have worked for or with a leader who tends to react, what is the impact on you and others ?

UNTHINKABLE – 5 : “Let Go” – Energy

The UNTHINKABLE articles were first posted on Linked In. 

I smile as I recognise that the speed of change and evolution now means that I’ve put developing this leadership model on hold for now. I am, however, leaving these 7 articles up as I feel they do illustrate core source issues and opportunities for leaders to look at in themselves prior to developing and practicing their own evolution of their leadership.

(The fifth in a series of articles inspired by a Sep 26, 2017 Workshop for Entrepreneurial Scotland)

As we progress through this series of articles on #OpenLeadership, we move now to what to focus on once we have some clarity on our Self-Knowledge. It is said that “knowledge is power”, so self-knowledge is key to leadership.

The next step from self-knowledge is to have the self-awareness of your state in any moment, as well as what influences your state.As my dear friend Suki Laniado Smithsigns off every email, “Awareness is the greatest agent for change”.

Once we have a degree of self-knowledge and then self-awareness, the next step is to do something with this, something I learned from Shirlaws to call “Managing the Energy”.

Whether we practice it or not, we are aware of the importance of managing our own energy, and some of us may have hired performance coaches. For lots of wonderful thought leadership, tools and information on this, take a look at the site of the amazing Vanessa Bennett and her team at Next Evolution Performance.

I will also be writing often in my posts on my site on topics such as self-knowledge, self-awareness and individual energy management. A recent post is on “Doing from Being” as an example.

However, for this post I want to focus on the importance for leaders of managing the energy of their team. For today then, two simple stories.

First, recently I met with a business leader of a fast growing specialist software company. As they sat down, I asked them how they were. “Stressed” was the reply. They then started to talk about their business and in general they were unconscious of their physical presence.

When they asked me for my thoughts on what they had downloaded, perhaps they were a little surprised to hear me reflect specifically on their state. I told them that they were emanating physical stress, from a tightness across the chest, to constriction of blood vessels, slight shortness of breath, tension in neck and other muscles.

After a joke along the lines of “should I get on the couch now ?, we changed the subject to talk about the business matters they had raised. However, a few minutes later I abruptly paused, looked at them, and said “what do you notice about yourself right now?”. They smiled, laughed a little, and said “I’ve relaxed”.

For this leader, by simply bringing awareness to their state being one of elevated stress, they had the tools to shift their state to one of relaxation, which then changed their thinking, the conversation, the energy they emanated. I would further suggest that when they went back to their office, the energy they radiated would have had a positive and productive impact on their team.

One more story of managing the energy, and this one a famous one from Rugby.

In 1990 the Scotland Rugby Captain, David Sole, chose to emerge onto the field for a critical game by, instead of the tradition of running out, leading his team on a “slow walk” with intent and focus in their stares and demeanour. As a young Scot, I remember watching this and feeling the game was already won before it actually started.

For more on this, watch a 7″ video here that tells the story.

How often do you pay attention to your state and bring awareness to it ? “Awareness is the greatest agent for change”, and sometimes all it takes to make a change is a little awareness.

As the Law of Thermodynamics says, energy cannot be created or destroyed, it may only change form. As a leader, be aware of your state, and where you feel stressed, look to convert that restrictive energy to one of positive and expansive energy for yourself and your team.

UNTHINKABLE – 4 : “Let Go” – Self-Knowledge

The UNTHINKABLE articles were first posted on Linked In. 

I smile as I recognise that the speed of change and evolution now means that I’ve put developing this leadership model on hold for now. I am, however, leaving these 7 articles up as I feel they do illustrate core source issues and opportunities for leaders to look at in themselves prior to developing and practicing their own evolution of their leadership.

(The fourth in a series of articles inspired by a Sep 26, 2017 Workshop for Entrepreneurial Scotland)

 

The previous two articles in this series looked at our fears as individuals, the importance of understanding them and the impact they have, as leaders, on our business and the people in it.

This then leads on to the three focal areas under the theme of “Let Go” that, when we focus upon them, support us in letting go of our fears so s to be able to lead effectively in times of unthinkable disruption.

Self-knowledge is a lifelong investment and I do encourage all of us to continually invest in ourselves in this area.

There are so many sources, resources and tools that come to us all the time once we open ourselves up to self-knowledge

One recent one for me was to discover a lady called Scilla Elworthy (hat tip to Justine Clement for sharing this knowledge with me).

Please do invest fifteen minutes to watch this stunning TED talk about the importance of self-knowledge in addressing conflict with non-violent approaches. As you watch it, please also observe the presence of Scilla. In this talk she openly discusses her own journey of knowing herself, and it clearly shows in her powerful and calm presence.

As an exercise from this focus on self-knowledge, please reflect on any or all of the powerful stories Scilla tells and find one story from an event in your own past where you felt present and aligned, and one story where you felt far less than your best. Write them down, by hand (there is power in writing by hand)

I’m keeping each article in this series short and with only a few points. Please do share your thoughts, ideas, tips on self-knowledge, I love collaboration !

UNTHINKABLE – 3 : “Let Go” – of our fears

The UNTHINKABLE articles were first posted on Linked In. 

I smile as I recognise that the speed of change and evolution now means that I’ve put developing this leadership model on hold for now. I am, however, leaving these 7 articles up as I feel they do illustrate core source issues and opportunities for leaders to look at in themselves prior to developing and practicing their own evolution of their leadership.

(The third in a series of articles inspired by a Sep 26, 2017 Workshop for Entrepreneurial Scotland)

I shared a story in the last article of a business leader who had their life unthinkably disrupted by a natural disaster.

I’m going to stay with the subject of identifying fears today, as we tend to avoid our fears or rationalize them away. Open Leadership is about being human and authentic, so let us bravely go deeper into our fears.

When I shared the story of the business leader in a group environment and asked them for feedback, a number gave rationale based responses, such as “they’ll be ok if insurance covers them”.

This was a wake up call to me about a) what it takes to empathise, and b) how we look to rationalize away uncomfortable feelings.

Having been through a similar natural disaster myself, my experience is that such an event knocks you down to the very bottom tier of the pyramid in Maslow’s hierarchy of needs.

(As an aside, one of my business heros is Chip Conley, who wrote an amazing book called Peak, where he took Maslow’s work into business.)

Empathy is a key trait of Open Leadership, and to empathise with people impacted it is key to recognize that our drivers in crisis situations are not based on our thinking, but on our feelings. In extreme situations, we even move beyond feelings into pure instinct, otherwise known as “fight or flight” or the amygdala or “lizard brain” as Seth Godin puts it.

The question posed in the last article was to ask readers to consider their deepest fears, and so gain some self-knowledge as to what our response would be to a crisis. Be clear that these personal fear drivers will absolutely impact your business and the people in it.

Now, short of putting you in the middle of a disaster and making you fear for your life and that of your family, I don’t have a magical way to help you identify your fears. What I recommend is simply to open yourself up to self-enquiry. The past is a great predictor of the future for such “baked in” drivers, so take some quiet time and reflect on this.

Look to recall crisis situations in your past. Yes, consider your business history, but this is unique to each person and our most formative years are our childhood. Remember these moments, remember how you responded, remember how others responded.

Please also share your feedback (and perhaps your fears and how they have impacted you and your business) in the comments.

UNTHINKABLE – 2 : “Let Go” – looking at our fears

The UNTHINKABLE articles were first posted on Linked In. 

I smile as I recognise that the speed of change and evolution now means that I’ve put developing this leadership model on hold for now. I am, however, leaving these 7 articles up as I feel they do illustrate core source issues and opportunities for leaders to look at in themselves prior to developing and practicing their own evolution of their leadership.

(The second in a series of articles inspired by a Sep 26, 2017 Workshop for Entrepreneurial Scotland)

 

The first in this series of articles featured a nascent Open Leadership Model.

The first theme for leaders is to Let Go of their fears, as we cannot lead from a place of fear, we must lead from a place of confidence and trust. Under this theme sit three focal points, and I will look at these in the next article.

For this article, though, let’s first look at our own fears. Take a moment to consider what your own deepest fears are as a human being, as who we are and what our values and beliefs are (and our fears) will always impact our business and the people involved in it.

To give you a story to stimulate your process, I share a story. A past client of mine lives in the Caribbean and is a star in their specialist field, leading their business in that country. On September 1st, they moved into their dream home with their spouse and two young children and pregnant with their third child.

Perfect family moment, and a stable foundation at home for a leader of a dynamic business, yes ? Now watch this one minute video :

“No walls… maybe because they’re attached to the roof….that’s right, well guess everybody, no roof!”

Less than two weeks later, they contacted me, having evacuated their whole business to another Caribbean Island. The presence they showed as a leader was inspirational and showed such self-knowledge and awareness.

How well do you know yourself, how would you have responded in such a staggeringly disruptive and unthinkable situation ?

UNTHINKABLE – 1 : Open Leadership – a new model

The UNTHINKABLE articles were first posted on Linked In. 

I smile as I recognise that the speed of change and evolution now means that I’ve put developing this leadership model on hold for now. I am, however, leaving these 7 articles up as I feel they do illustrate core source issues and opportunities for leaders to look at in themselves prior to developing and practicing their own evolution of their leadership.

(first in a series of articles inspired by a Sep 26, 2017 Workshop for Entrepreneurial Scotland)

UNTHINKABLE – Tools for confident leaders in our age of disruption

The workshop was based on the premise that leadership as we know it will not serve us in the times we now live in. Times of rapidly accelerating change and disruption, as well as unthinkable events. Strategic planning and old school “command and control” “expert” leadership simply don’t and won’t work anymore.

The group at the workshop truly inspired me and this will be the first in a series of articles featuring the themes, content, tools and learnings captured from the workshop.

In this first article I introduce a new model for Open Leadership created for the workshop. I encourage readers to share thoughts and ideas, to collaborate. No one person has the answers to everything anymore, but I am sure that together we can evolve new models for leadership such as this nascent one !

This model has three themes, one leading on from the other. Future articles will elaborate, but this first article I will summarise the model and themes.

At the centre, it takes BRAVERY to lead in such a space of uncertainty, where the role of the leader is no longer to have the answers, but in fact to create an environment where the questions that need to be answered come forward and the answers are found within and across the organisation.

The model has three themes.

LET GO

  • The starting point for leaders is to Let Go of their fears, as we cannot lead from a place of fear, we must lead from a place of confidence and trust.
  • In order to let go, we must first focus on SELF-KNOWLEDGE, deeply looking into ourselves to understand our fears and drivers.
  • We can then seek to become deeply aware of our ENERGY and how we show up in the world and as leaders.
  • What is our ability to respond vs react ? What is our RESPONSE-ABILITY ?

OPEN LEADERSHIP

  • VISION as a concept must change to a general sense of direction, subject to frequent course correction. A very different model for visionary leadership.
  • COLLABORATION. Open Leadership is truly collaborative
  • HUMILITY. The seven most powerful words in business “I don’t’ know, what do you think” (when delivered with confidence that the answer is within the collective).

PURPOSE

  • Similar to Vision, our new world requires a simple COMPASS to follow around the higher purpose of the organisations
  • As change is rapid, unpredictable and continuous, a focus on a deeply aligned CULTURE that is truly integrated into all areas of the organisation is critical
  • With all of the above, the opportunity is there to find HIDDEN ASSETS in your business. They are never on the Balance Sheet, nor typically visible to those in the business. It takes a fresh perspective to see them and change direction.

This is a top line summary of the model, yet already I hope you can see why it is drawn as a continuing circle. The more each element is focussed upon, the more is unlocked around the model in every area.

In coming articles I will expand on the model and also introduce tools, tips and content that has inspired me to learn and share.

In addition, in true collaborative fashion, I love that LI allows editing of articles, so this and other articles in the series will morph and change based on your collaborative feedback !

UNTHINKABLE – a series on #OpenLeadership

The UNTHINKABLE articles were first posted on Linked In. 

**I smile as I recognise that the speed of change and evolution now means that I’ve put developing this leadership model on hold for now. I am, however, leaving these 7 articles up as I feel they do illustrate core source issues and opportunities for leaders to look at in themselves prior to developing and practicing their own evolution of their leadership.

Unthinkable model

1 : Open Leadership – a new model

2 : “Let Go” – what are your fears?

3 : “Let Go” – of our fears

4 : “Let Go” – Self-Knowledge

5 : “Let Go” – Energy

6 : “Let Go” – Response-Ability

7: Open Leadership – What is it ?

Movies with Meaning – the complete list

Each week for many months I wrote a “Movies with Meaning” post. From mid June 2018, I’ve suspended that weekly structure so such posts may be more sporadic, allow more #Flow if you will. This list, though, will remain highlighted for readers to be inspired to search for one on the site, view a trailer, get my thoughts, then perhaps watch it themselves !

You may have watched them, you may not. Either way, this is an offer to you to search on a movie title from the list below, follow to the post where it is featured, along with a meaning linked to the movie, then watch (or rewatch) through that lens.

Oh, and when you search on the movie title, sometimes you may find more than one post. There is no search error there, some are featured two or more times with different meanings and themes! Three movies featured multiple times are :

The complete list (updated as at June 10, 2018), now over 70 movies :

A River Runs Through It
Any Given Sunday
Arrival
Being There
Braveheart
Chariots of fire
Children of Men
Cloud Atlas
Coach Carter
Contact
Darkest Hour
Dead Poets Society
Die Hard
Eight Men Out
Ferris Bueller’s Day Off
Frost/Nixon
Field of Dreams
Gandhi
Gone Girl
Good Will Hunting
Groundhog Day
Harry Potter
High Fidelity
Home Alone
Hoosiers
Horton Hears a Who
Inception
Interstellar
Invictus
Jacob’s Ladder
Local Hero
Love Actually
Lucy
Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence
Michael Clayton
Molly’s Game
Moneyball
Moulin Rouge
Papillon
Rashomon
Rollerball
Romeo & Juliet
Rush
Saving Private Ryan
Say Anything
Scent of a Woman
Senna
Shawshank Redemption
Silent Running
SpyGame
Steve Jobs
Strictly Ballroom
The Adjustment Bureau
The Big Lebowski
The Flying Scotsman
The Greatest Showman
The Insider
The Intern
The Lives of Others
The King’s Speech
The Matrix
The Mission
The Post
The Prestige
The Usual Suspects
The Water Diviner
This is Spinal Tap
To Kill a Mockingbird
Twelve Angry Men
Unbreakable
V for Vendetta
Vantage Point
What Happened to Monday?

Writing – Inspiration, Energy, Accountability

Over the years I’ve shared my thoughts prolifically via my writing. After a long hiatus,  I’m once again energised and inspired to write again.

This site was set up as a vehicle for me to write (and to create accountability and discipline to do so !

This site will host my writing going forwards, including links to work on other platforms, such as LinkedIn.

I’m doing something my future self will thank me for !

do something today